Stunts ♥

 

The Shoulder Sit

A Basic Cheer stunt, step by step.

Okay, first of all, a basic shoulder sit has 1 flier, 1 base, and a back-spot is optional.If you are trying it for the first time though, I would recommend you have a spotter nearby for safety.

A quick overview of stunt positions for newbies, you can skip if you already know this:

The one above is the flier. The objective of all stunts is to get the flier in the air. The base(s) keep the flier up, and the (back, front, side) spots prevent her from falling, the front and back spots also help when the flier is getting down,  and the back is the overseer of the stunt.

Instructions:

Base- Lunge forward, creating a pocket with your leg, as you would preparing for a thigh stand. When the fliers foot is in the pocket, wrap your arm securely around that leg. Move with the flier, as she swings her leg over your opposite shoulder, simultaneously put your other arm around that leg and streighten until you are standing your full height. Once she is up there, keep your hands over her knees, pulling down.

Flier- Place your foot evenly in the pocket of your bases bent knee. Stand up straight, and swing your leg over the other shoulder of the base. Once your leg is securely over the side, you may sit down on her shoulders.

Possible Spots – In this stunt you don’t need to touch the flier, keep a close distance, and if she is scared or is close to falling, call down the stunt.

Cheerleading Pyramid Terms

Cheerleading pyramids are essentially one big train of stunting activity. By creatively combining lifts, poses and dismounts, you end up with a sort of mega stunt that is visually impressive. It’s important that all the squad members are on the same page. So, when you’re teaching cheerleading pyramids to the squad for the first time, it is good to start with the right vocabulary.

  • Flyer: The flyer is the very top of the pyramid. She is known as the flyer because she will “fly” back down to safety.
  • Base: The base is the person on the bottom of the pyramid.
  • One-and-a-half-high: This refers to the levels of the pyramid and means the pyramid is the height of one person plus half of the height of another.
  • Two-high: The pyramid is the height of two people.
  • Two-and-a-half-high: The pyramid is the height of two and a half people. These pyramids are sometimes illegal in cheerleading competitions for certain squads. They also require an additional spotter in the front and the back for the top tier flyer.

How to Build a Pyramid

A pyramid, can be dissected into several parts:

  • The transition or set up: This is when all the cheerleaders get into place.
  • The load: This refers to the manner in which you get the flyer to the top.
  • The “hit”: Hitting a pyramid is when you strike your final pose so that your audience can see the pyramid.
  • The dismount: The flyer dismounts when she jumps off the pyramid and lands safely on the ground.

When you first begin working on a new pyramid, it’s important that you go slowly and take time to make sure everyone knows what they are doing. Safety, above everything else, needs to be your first concern. Follow this step by step guide for building the best cheerleading pyramids.

Setting It Up

Have you ever gone through an entire stunt sequence, explaining every move and transition in detail only to find your squad staring blankly back at you? The first step in executing a great cheerleading pyramid is to figure out what it will look like at the end.

Try arranging your flyers on the floor first. You can use spotters to help if needed. But the idea is to see how the pyramid will look before you put your flyers up in the air. Also, this will allow them to become comfortable with the body position needed to “hit” the pyramid in the air. If that doesn’t work, draw a picture.
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Partner Stunting

One sure fire way to miss your pyramid is to not have solid stunting skills. Before you ever attempt to link a pyramid together, spend some time making sure that your flyers can hit their stunts on cue perfectly. At times, this might seem like a tedious step, but consider it an important safety step. If your pyramid is two-and-a-half-high, your mid-bases need to be completely confident in their body positions and what they’re doing before you ever attempt to load the top flyer.

Dismounts

Everyone in the entire pyramid needs to be clear on how the flyer is going to dismount. Spotters especially need to be aware of their positions and their role in the dismount. The flyer needs to be confident in executing her dismount. One way to make sure that everyone in the entire pyramid knows what to do is to break it down into sections and practice the appropriate dismounting.

Five Steps To a Cheerleading Pyramid

Three girls in pyramid

1. Break up the pyramid into sections or sides. Build each side one at a time before putting it together. Use extra spotters and catchers the fist time.2. Load the mid-bases. Make sure they are solid and steady.

3. Load the top flyers.

4. If the flyer comes down but the mid-bases remain, load the flyer again. If the flyer still can’t hit it, take a break to avoid fatiguing the bases.

5. Once the top flyer gets in position and hits it, have her dismount first. Next the mid-bases should dismount.

After everyone can hit all their positions, putting it together should be very easy!

The Thigh Stand

      Okay, first you have to know the basic parts of this stunt. In the basic thigh-stand we have 2 bases 1 Flier and 1 spot.

 

The one above is the flier. The objective of all stunts is to get the flier in the air. The base(s) keep the flier up, and the (back, front, side) spots prevent her from falling, the front and back spots also help when the flier is getting down,  and the back is the overseer of the stunt.

Bases -

Right base = Start in a lunge position with your left leg bent and left foot perpendicular to the crowd you are facing.  Your right leg should be straight and your right foot will face towards the crowd.  Keep your upper body facing the crowd at all times. Over lap your knees with the other base. When the flier places her foot, take your right arm around the back of the flier’s left leg and brace above her knee.  Your right hand needs to brace under the flier’s left foot.  Before she steps up, make sure you are bracing her to your body.  For the dismount, join hand withs the flier using your right hand and assist the flier’s waist with your left hand on the way down.


Left Base = Same as right, mirrored, the fliers foot will jump into your hand, so be steady and prepared to grip her foot strongly. Your leg should be in front of the right bases leg.

Flier -

Place your right foot in the pocket of the right base in front of you.  Leave your left foot on the ground and place your hands on the shoulders of the bases. Step off of the ground with your left foot, pushing off of the bases shoulders, locking your legs, and riding your hips up. Place your left foot in the pocket of the left base in front of you. Once both feet are secure, lift your chest up and finish with whatever pose your Coach recommends (Typically a Hi-V or goalpost). When coming down, grab the hands of both bases and jump down.

Back Spot -

Start behind the flier and grab their waist with your hands, steadily. Follow her up and down with the stunt, never letting go until her feet touch the ground.

______________________________________________________________

There is another variation of this stunt, the single-based thigh-stand.

 


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// ]]>The set up is the same, only there is a single base holding up the stunt. For the flier, the leg is generally either out to the side, pushed backwords, or curled, as pictured.

_________________________________________________________________

Thats it for this stunt. Have fun cheering, and remember – NEVER LET THE FLIER HIT THE GROUND.

Cheerleading Stunts for Beginners
Follow the below given cheerleading stunts step by step. The stunts can be dangerous so perform them in the presence of some expert.

Pony Sit Or Pony Mount
This is one of the most easy cheerleading stunts for the beginners. This will need the base, the flyer and the spotter. First the base should bend her legs a bit, placing her hands over the thighs with locked arms and head up. Then the flyer will sit on the back of the base by keep her knees on the thighs of the base. The flyer should sit bit higher to reduce the risk of hurting the base. Now as the work of a spotter is to protect the flyer, she holds the flyer at her waist for supports.

Double Thigh Stand
This is a very important stunt for beginners as you can make full use of it by making variations. Two base are required in this stunt who should have deep lunges. The flyer will step up on one of the base’s lunge and then put her other leg on the other base’s lunges. The flyer should remember not to keep her legs on the thighs of the base. The spotter holds the waist of the flyer to give her support.

Swedish Fall
This stunt requires three base and a flyer. The bases should support the flyer with their arms locked. The flyer should have a tight body and her arms locked. One base holding the arms of the flyer, one holding her waist and the third holding the flyer’s hips in a lifted position. The flyer should point her toes outward as this will give a good look to the stunt.

Hanging Stag
This stunt is also very important as it can be used in various positions and combination. Two base are required in this stunt. The flyer should spread her arms in a ‘T’ position with arms locked. Both the base will hold her from the arms and her wrist and will lift her up. The spotter will hold her at her waist.

L-Sit & L-Stand
First we will talk about L-sit stunt. The base will make a deep lung where the flyer will sit while placing one of her foot on the lunge and the other foot stretched and pointed. The base holds the pointed foot of the flyer from the calf. Now coming to the L-stand their are two base in it. The flyer places one foot on the main base’s lunge and other foot is lifted side wise by the other base. The main base should keep her legs locked all the time. The spotter holds the flyer on the waist.

I know as you were going through the stunts you must be imagining the positions, and when you will try it then you will get to know that its not so easy. But as you know practice makes a man perfect you definitely have to work hard to get perfection. You can go through the cheerleading exercises to get a proper body for this sport. I hope these cheerleading stunts for beginners will help you for sure but it is always advisable to perform it under the supervision of some experienced cheerleading professional.

Prep or Extension Prep[1][2] 
(Also called an “elevator” “double-base” or “half” in some regions)[verification needed] A stunt in which flyer stands with one foot in the hands of each base held at shoulder level. The two bases, facing each other, hold the feet of the upright flyer at collar-bone level, so the flyer is standing about shoulder-width apart. The back spot holds the ankles of the flyer.
Cupie or Awesome[1] 
The Cupie is almost identical to the Full Extension except that the flyer’s feet are together, in one hand of a single base or with one foot each in the hands of two bases. In a partner stunt the difference between a cupie and an awesome has to do with what the male is doing with his free hand. If the free hand is on the hip then it is a cupie, if the free hand is in a high V then it’s an awesome.[3]
Extension[1][2] 
Flyer stands with each foot in the hands of a base while her arms are in an extended overhead position. The back can either hold the ankles of the flyer, or support the wrists of the bases. In a single based stunt, the base will hold both of the flyer’s feet above his/her head, with arms locked.

A flyer in a split lift

Split-lift or Teddy Sit
The flier is in a seated straddle with one base holding each leg and the backspot holds the same way as a sponge.
Thigh stand[1] 
(beginner level): A Thigh Stand is one of the simplest stunts. The bases kneel on one leg or are in a lunge position. The bases have their feet touching each other by the sides of their shoes. The back spot will hold the flyer at the waist. She will then jump onto the bases thighs.

 

Prep or Extension Prep[1][2] 
(Also called an “elevator” “double-base” or “half” in some regions)[verification needed] A stunt in which flyer stands with one foot in the hands of each base held at shoulder level. The two bases, facing each other, hold the feet of the upright flyer at collar-bone level, so the flyer is standing about shoulder-width apart. The back spot holds the ankles of the flyer.
Cupie or Awesome[1] 
The Cupie is almost identical to the Full Extension except that the flyer’s feet are together, in one hand of a single base or with one foot each in the hands of two bases. In a partner stunt the difference between a cupie and an awesome has to do with what the male is doing with his free hand. If the free hand is on the hip then it is a cupie, if the free hand is in a high V then it’s an awesome.[3]
Extension[1][2] 
Flyer stands with each foot in the hands of a base while her arms are in an extended overhead position. The back can either hold the ankles of the flyer, or support the wrists of the bases. In a single based stunt, the base will hold both of the flyer’s feet above his/her head, with arms locked.

A flyer in a split lift

Split-lift or Teddy Sit
The flier is in a seated straddle with one base holding each leg and the backspot holds the same way as a sponge.
Thigh stand[1] 
(beginner level): A Thigh Stand is one of the simplest stunts. The bases kneel on one leg or are in a lunge position. The bases have their feet touching each other by the sides of their shoes. The back spot will hold the flyer at the waist. She will then jump onto the bases thighs.

[edit] Variations

All of the variations can be done at prep or extension level.

Liberty[2] 
One or more bases holds up the flyer by the foot and the flyer balances weight on one straight leg. The flyer’s other leg is bent with the foot positioned at about the knee level of the flyer, nestling it alongside the standing leg’s knee. The name of this stunt is often shortened to ‘Lib’.
Scorpion 
This is a liberty variation facing the side. One or more bases holds up the flyer by the foot and the flyer balances weight on that one straight leg. The flyer then grabs the loose foot and bends that leg upward behind the body until the toes are close to the back of the head, in a position resembling a scorpion’s tail. The foot is secured in place by the opposite hand. A more advanced variation of the scorpion is the “Chin-hold,” where the flyer tucks her foot underneath her own chin.

Scorpions at extension level.

Scale 
This is a liberty variation facing the side. One or more bases extend one of the flyer’s feet. The flyer’s other leg is held by the flyer’s hand to the side and the leg is fully extended. The position is similar to the Scorpion, but one of the flyer’s hands holds her ankle or calf (instead of her toes) and the other arm is in the High V position.

Prep level Scale

Crazy Eight 
Similar to a scale, but the ankle is supported by the flyer’s wrist while her hands clasp to form a circle above her head. The resulting pose is resembles an Eight, due to the two circles, one formed by her arms, and the other by her leg and side.
Torch 
The base group faces forward holding the foot as a side base would. While the flyer is holding a one-legged extended stunt while facing 90 degrees sideways from the base.
Heel Stretch 
Variation of a liberty. It is a stunt in which the base/bases holds one foot of the flyer while she holds the other foot in an elevated stretch position with her same hand.
Bow and Arrow
Variation of a heel stretch. The flyer grabs her foot with the opposite hand. Then she pulls her arm through and puts it in front of her leg, holding it straight.
Needle 
Variation of liberty facing the side. The main difference in a regular scale and a needle is the flyer’s position in the air. Where in a normal scale the chest is either parallel or higher than the hip on the supporting leg, a needle scale the chest is down beside the main support leg. Also, the leg that was supported by hands in a regular scale is now “free” and is pointing to near as north or “12 o’clock” as flexibility allows the flyer to obtain. The flyer also maintains balance by holding onto the bases hands and her own ankle. Sometimes called a spike.
Arabesque 
Variation of liberty facing the side. From a lib, the flyer points their leg out behind them and their arms are in a “T” position.
Hitch 
A hitch is a variation of the prep or extension. One of the side bases turn to face forward and lifts the flyer’s foot in an extension; or high enough so that the flyer’s knee is bent at a 90 degree angle. So this doesn’t leave all of the weight on the other base, the back swiftly moves her hand so that both of her hands are supporting the non-bent leg.
All of the variations can be done at prep or extension level.
Liberty[2] 
One or more bases holds up the flyer by the foot and the flyer balances weight on one straight leg. The flyer’s other leg is bent with the foot positioned at about the knee level of the flyer, nestling it alongside the standing leg’s knee. The name of this stunt is often shortened to ‘Lib’.
Scorpion 
This is a liberty variation facing the side. One or more bases holds up the flyer by the foot and the flyer balances weight on that one straight leg. The flyer then grabs the loose foot and bends that leg upward behind the body until the toes are close to the back of the head, in a position resembling a scorpion’s tail. The foot is secured in place by the opposite hand. A more advanced variation of the scorpion is the “Chin-hold,” where the flyer tucks her foot underneath her own chin.

Scorpions at extension level.

Scale 
This is a liberty variation facing the side. One or more bases extend one of the flyer’s feet. The flyer’s other leg is held by the flyer’s hand to the side and the leg is fully extended. The position is similar to the Scorpion, but one of the flyer’s hands holds her ankle or calf (instead of her toes) and the other arm is in the High V position.

Prep level Scale

Crazy Eight 
Similar to a scale, but the ankle is supported by the flyer’s wrist while her hands clasp to form a circle above her head. The resulting pose is resembles an Eight, due to the two circles, one formed by her arms, and the other by her leg and side.
Torch 
The base group faces forward holding the foot as a side base would. While the flyer is holding a one-legged extended stunt while facing 90 degrees sideways from the base.
Heel Stretch 
Variation of a liberty. It is a stunt in which the base/bases holds one foot of the flyer while she holds the other foot in an elevated stretch position with her same hand.
Bow and Arrow
Variation of a heel stretch. The flyer grabs her foot with the opposite hand. Then she pulls her arm through and puts it in front of her leg, holding it straight.
Needle 
Variation of liberty facing the side. The main difference in a regular scale and a needle is the flyer’s position in the air. Where in a normal scale the chest is either parallel or higher than the hip on the supporting leg, a needle scale the chest is down beside the main support leg. Also, the leg that was supported by hands in a regular scale is now “free” and is pointing to near as north or “12 o’clock” as flexibility allows the flyer to obtain. The flyer also maintains balance by holding onto the bases hands and her own ankle. Sometimes called a spike.
Arabesque 
Variation of liberty facing the side. From a lib, the flyer points their leg out behind them and their arms are in a “T” position.
Hitch 
A hitch is a variation of the prep or extension. One of the side bases turn to face forward and lifts the flyer’s foot in an extension; or high enough so that the flyer’s knee is bent at a 90 degree angle. So this doesn’t leave all of the weight on the other base, the back swiftly moves her hand so that both of her hands are supporting the non-bent leg.

[edit] Transitions, Tosses, and Dismounts

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A flyer coming out of a pike flipping basket toss

Basket toss[1][2] 
A basket toss is an advanced stunt in which the bases propel the flyer upwards (10-30+ feet) from the loading position. It is a toss by a maximum of four bases of a top straight up in the air so the flyer can perform a trick (toe touch, ball-out, kiss-out, pretty girl, twist, tuck, kick twist down, pike, etc.) and then land back in a cradle position. It gets its name from the basket, or square, the bases get from locking wrists. The basket is assembled by each base grabbing their own right wrist with their left hand, then using their right hand to grab each others’ left wrist. The flyer, with some assistance from the back spot, will place her feet on the square created to minimize pressure. There will also be a front spot (pumper) which places hands under the stunt and helps to toss the flyer into the air. The bases dip, stand up, dip again, and then throw using all of their power.
Basket Toss variations include:
  • Toe Touch basket toss – During the basket toss, when the flyer is thrown into the air she stays in the “pencil” position. once starting to fall, she does the toetouch jump, quickly pops back into pencil, and then into the cradle.
  • Pretty Girl/Show off basket toss – When in the air, the flyer will do her legs like in a lib[erty] and put one hand on her waist and one behind her head, laying down.
  • Kick twist basket toss – At the height of the basket before falling, the flyer will kick one leg up then twist her body into a cradle. The flyer may twist up to two times.
  • Pretty Girl Kick Twist bsket toss – During the ride the flyer does the pretty girl and at the height of the basket performs the kick twist.
  • Tuck basket toss – while in the air the flyer will perform a tuck (front or back) then pop into cradle.
  • X-out basket toss/X-Full – same as tuck basket toss, but while upside down in the tuck the flyer will perform the jump “spread eagle” which will make the body look like a X.
  • Pike basket toss – same as toetouch basket toss but the flyer will perform a pike.
  • Star basket toss – in the air, once starting to fall, the flyer will put a leg up like in a scale, and the other will be straight facing diagonally downward. the hands will be in a high V, then she’ll pop back into pencil. In some variations, the flyer will spin while in the Star jump.
Ball Up
The bases launch the flier in the air. She stays in a ball until she hits her peak, and stands up in a one leg extension. These are commonly followed by a tick tock.
Launch
Almost like a basket toss except hands are in formation of a prep or extension.
Pop Cradle or Cradle Down[1] 
Dismount from a stunt in which the base/bases toss the flyer straight up from a stationary stunt then catch the flyer in a seated position pike position.
Dismount 
A way to return the flyer to the floor or complete a stunt.
Squish (or Sponge)[1] 
Two bases will each hold a different foot of a flyer at their waist level. The flyer is squatted down so the flyer is not taller than the bases. This is how the flyer loads in to the stunt, before jumping and pushing off the bases shoulders, and the bases drive their arms upwards and extend the flyer.
Retake or Double Take
When a stunt is extended in the air, and then goes back down into a load-in position placing both feet in the bases hands, if previously in a one-footed stunt, and being pushed back upwards into another stunt.
Show and Go[1] 
Two bases will each hold a different foot of a flyer and bring it up to a full extension. The flyer only stays up for two counts and returns back into a squish position. Also known as ‘fake-outs’ or ‘flashes’. Depending on the stunt, the flyer can throw any number of tricks in a show and go. If loading in with both feet, most times the flyer will “show” a cupie, and after reloading, come back up to a cupie in either a prep or extension level. Another variation is the one-legged show and go, where a flyer starts as if in a one-legged stunt, and “shows” one leg kicked up to the heel stretch position (without grabbing the ankle or instep). As this variation is brought back down, the flyer brings in her leg from the flash and reloads in either a two or one legged sponge, “going” back up to prep or extension level.
Tick-Tock[1] 
When a flyer switches the foot being stood on in mid air after being popped by bases.
College cheerleaders doing as flipping transition

A flyer performing a double down

Full Down (Twist Cradle) 
Variation on a pop cradle. It is a dismount from a stunt in which the base/bases toss the flyer straight up from a stationary stunt, the flyer does a 360 degree turn in the air, and then the bases catch her in a cradle position. Called a Single Down, Single, or Full Down in some Regions.
Double Down (Double Twist Cradle) 
Variation on a pop cradle. The same as a full twist cradle, but two 360 degree turns are completed before cradling. There are also increasing numbers of twist downs possible, often as many as five, witnessed especially when four males are basing a basket toss, however no more than two twists are allowed in competition at any level.
Leap Frog or popcorn 
Usually a transition where the bases “hop” top person over the backspots head and catch her in either a smush or cradle.
Reload 
A transition that connects two stunts when a flyer cradles out of the first stunt, and the bases dip and pop the flyer back into a load position. A similar stunt is a barrel roll. Sometimes called a ‘cradle pop’.
Barrel Roll 
Seated in a pike position, (as if she had just cradled down) the bases toss the flyer, she lays flat and does a 360 degree spin in the air.
Full up 
A variation on the double take in which the flyer does a full turn in the air to the right in between stunts while staying in contact with the bases. Also called a 360 up in some regions.
Double up 
The more advanced version of the Full up where two complete 360 degree turns are made
Rewind 
An advanced stunt load where the flyer is tossed into the air by her base/bases, she then does a back tuck and brings her feet in contact with her base/bases
Walk Down 
A dismount where the flyer does a full turn to the left in a standing position while having her right foot in contact with the bases.
Deadman 
When the flyer falls backwards or forwards out of a stunt where 3 or 4 people catch the flyer and could possbly push the flyer back up to the bases hands.[4]
Swedish Falls 
Center bases face each other, legs shoulder width apart, arms straight and hands on each other’s shoulders, a flyer stands behind each base, facing the bases’ backs. Flyers place hands on bases’ shoulders, each flyer has a second base. These bases squat in between the other base and the flyer. They hold the flyers’ waists, third base holds the flyers upstage leg—one hand on her thigh and the other on her ankle.
On 1, 2, down, up, the flyer bends her knees and jumps. The second and third bases lift the flyer up, fully extending their arms. The flyer’s arms are also fully extended. The center bases have the flyers’ weight on their shoulders. They support each other to maintain balance. Both flyers lift their downstage leg (the base is only holding the upstage leg). The second and third bases lower the flyer on the dismount.
21/2 people high is defined as 2.5 body-lengths, not the number of people stacked. An example of 2.5 high is one person held at extended level, and another held at waist level. The various 21/2 high stunts include but are not limited to:

  • The A-Frame
  • Swedish Fall
  • 2-2-1
  • 2-1-1 (Technically a 3 high pyramid if the top flier is in an extended stunt but still considered legal)
  • Table Top
  • Wolf Wall
  • High Split
  • High Chair (also high hands, lib, cupie, etc.)
 

 

 

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